Friday, August 15, 2014

Nothing ever changes...



From "The North Platte Semi-Weekly" paper (North Platte, Nebraska), April 19, 1898.

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

What am I reading?

Well, at the moment, a lot of things. I am listening to the audiobook version of Shadow of Night (by Deborah Harkness). I am reading a biography of Virginia Woolf (the one by Hermione Lee), and slowly making my way through The Untethered Soul (by Michael Singer). The Harkness book is good, but there is a lot that could be easily left out and it is trying my patience a bit. And if there is mention of another "nudging glance," I will scream. I just started the Woolf bio, and I imagine that will take a long time. The final book on this list results from the fact that I have had some turmoil in my life recently, and I find this soothing to read. So, here's hoping it rubs off on me. :)

My Great-Great-Great-Grandmother was a "Mean Girl"

Always fun to find out your third great-grandmother was causing trouble for Ulysses S. Grant and his future wife. Sounds like my great-great-great grandmother was a "mean girl." (Her name is Fanny Morrison, and her sister is Georgia Morrison.) AND I really want to know what is going on with the apple seed incident...:

From a letter from Ulysses S. Grant to Julia Dent (his future wife)...



“The happiness of seeing you again can hardly be realized, and then like you I have so much that I would like to say and don’t want to write. –Julia do tell me the secrets that Georgia M disclosed to you—I think I can guess them from what follows in your letter—Georgia M is a very nice modest and inexperienced girl and can very easily be made to believe anything her oldest sister tells her—I know very well that Fanny has told her that I was in love with her and she founds her reasons for thinking so upon what followed took place at your house—You remember the occurrence of the apple seeds? Fanny has tried to find out from Mr. Hazlitt which I loved best Georgia or Julia—Mr. Hazlitt would not tell her which he thought because to please her he would have to tell what he believed to be a story, and to have said you (as he believed though of course he knew nothing about certain) he thought would give unnecessary offense. Hazlitt told me of the conversation he had and it displeased me so much with Miss F. that I said things of her which I would not commit to paper—Believe me my dear Julia what ever Miss Georgia may have told you she no doubt believed herself, but in believing she has allowed herself to be the dupe of one older than she is, but whose experience in love affairs, ought to be worth a great deal more than it is.”